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Servicemen's Readjustment Act (GI Bill) Secondary sources
by ROBEL MAHARI - Wednesday, March 9, 2016, 10:21 PM
 

World War II had an immense impact on all aspects of American life, wether it be economically, politcally, or socially. The second world war changed the lives of many espically for those who fough in the war. Post world war was a time of new legistation for the United States and one of those legistaltions was the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, more commonly know as the GI Bill. The GI Bill was another form of relief just like others from the time period but this was exclusion to veteran ( commonly referred to G.I.'s). "Straight" white veterans. The GI Bill provided for college or vocational (job training) education as well as one-year of unemployment compensation. It also provided loans for returning veterans to buy homes and start businesses. But of course the The GI bill excluded blacks. Why wouldn't they. The GI Bill provided benefits to both sides, the vet. and the government. The bill turned out to be very lucrative for the as it helped aid in building strong member of society who be able to pay their taxes. The GI Bill also wasn't provided to anyone who was discharged from the army dishonerably, the gays. Dishonerable dischagred and blue slips were given to anyone who expressed gay tendecies. The packet rarley ever calls the vets as gays but refers to them as expressing gay tendencies. I couldn't but question the wording. Why tendecies? There must've been men who were falsely convicted. Not only were they not granted access to the bill but the dishonarable discharge followed them on every job and college application. I believe that the bill was a good bill to a hand picked group of people. History doesn't repeat itself but it rhymes. With that said I did'nt expect an inclusive bill. Come to think about it the bill the bill more opressing than uprising. The Bill created a circle of families of blacks dependent on welfare and public housing and generation of college less education